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Tucson Media Market Facts

Tucson Media Market Facts

Tucson Radio Market
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The Tucson radio market ranks 62nd according to Arbitron, with a P12+ metro population of ~847,200

The radio market in Tucson delivers its audience well.  Listenership measurements are done four times a year by survey. Some general rules of thumb:

  • It is possible to reach 20-25% of most target demos spending $3000-4000 per week on Tucson radio; 50% reach requires an investment of around $8000 per week.
  • Schedules airing on the top four to six stations, when negotiated and placed right, often reach about 50% of the market each week.
  • Due to its relative isolation and international border 60 miles south, the Tucson radio market does not tend to have the “bleed” of signals from other markets that can complicate and fragment listenership in some markets.  This also makes Tucson a desirable test market.
  • Roughly 11% of Tucsonans have listened to satellite radio in the past week (Scarborough R2, 2012).

Here are the Arbitron Summer 2012 Radio Station Rankings with Persons 12+…

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…and with Adults 25-54:

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Tucson Television Market
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Tucson’s television broadcast market ranks 70th in Nielsen’s market rankings of DMAs (Designated Market Areas) based on the market’s 438,440 TV homes.  Of those TV households, approximately 26% are Hispanic, and 3.3% are African American households.  78% of TV households have multiple TV sets.

The television market in Tucson drives results for our advertisers.  Some facts:

  • With Tucson television, approximately 35% of the market can be reached in a 50 mile radius, spending roughly $4000 a week (in most target demos); To reach 85% of the market, an investment of about $9-10,000 per week is typically needed.
  • Affiliate stations include KOLD (CBS), KVOA(NBC), KGUN (ABC), KMSB (Fox), KWBA (CW) and KTTU (My).
  • Cable coverage is provided by two companies: Cox and Comcast.  Cox coverage is primarily metro Tucson, south of River Road to the city boundaries; Comcast covers the foothills of the market, north of River road and along Wrightstown Road.  Combined cable penetration is 46%.
  • 42% of the Tucson market subscribes to satellite/ADS; 34% of households own a DVR (Nielsen Index, Nov. 2012).
  • Like the radio market, Tucson experiences negligible television signal bleed from other markets.

 

In the November 2012 Nielsen book, the top programs in Tucson amongst households were:

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In the demo Adults 25-54, top TV programs in Tucson (Nielsen, Nov 2012):

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Tucson Cable TV Market
image031 Cable penetration in the Tucson market is hovering around 46%. Two systems cover the market: Cox Cable, primarily south of River Road and Comcast Cable, mainly covering north of River Road. Cox Cable also provides services in Green Valley, AZ, which is included in a Cox ad placement. Sierra Vista and Nogales spot placements can also be made with Cox.

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Print

There are many print publication options for advertisers in Southern Arizona.  With so many options, we carefully assess your needs and determine the best fit that will deliver results using these publications.  We carefully consider each publication’s: geography, readership demographics, circulation and cost-per-thousand to reach that circulation, means of distribution, and past results we have observed through years of experience with these publications.  Here is a list:

 

Daily newspaper:

  • The Arizona Daily Star (Sunday circ ~170M; weekday circ: ~100-120M)

 

Weekly tabloid newspapers:

  • Inside Tucson Business – business news
  • Tucson Weekly – community news, arts, entertainment
  • La Estrella – Spanish language news and entertainment; in the Daily Star and free in newsstands
  • Explorer Newspapers – originally NW Tucson news and happenings; now expanding eastward
  • Marana Weekly News – NW Tucson and Marana, AZ community news

 

Monthly newspapers:

  • The Desert Leaf – mailed to homes in foothills and northwest Tucson
  • Bear Essential News – children’s newspaper distributed through schools and public libraries
  • Never Too Late – news and information for seniors distributed by Pima Council on Aging
  • Foothills News – News in Foothills area  85718, 85750 and 85704

 

Monthly magazines:

  • Tucson Lifestyle – area living, entertainment, real estate and events – glossy magazine
  • Tucson Home and Garden – décor, real estate, entertaining, landscaping – published by Tucson Lifestyle
  • Fitness Plus – health, fitness, sports events and information magazine
  • Lovin’ Life – mails to subscriber base of active seniors; topics include events, activities, news and health information
  • North Tucson Living Magazine  (published by the Tucson Shopper)- covers local issues, sports, schools, profiles of North Tucson residents and businesses.

 

Quarterly glossy magazines:

  • Tucson Home – décor, real estate, entertaining – published by Madden Media
  • Tucson Guide Quarterly – things to see and do in Southern Arizona – published by Madden Media
  • Biz Tucson – Southern Arizona business, development and technology news
  • Luxe Magazine  – high end décor, lifestyle, real estate and home glossy magazine
  • Indulge Magazine (published by the Arizona Daily Star) – high end products (minimal editorial) –mailed to upscale homes.

 

Other magazines / publications

  • Programs for the Arts – arts and entertainment information / performance pieces at various Tucson arts events including the Tucson Symphony, UA Presents, Arizona Opera and Arizona Theater Company)
  • Tucson Relocation Guide – annual information piece distributed throughout the year with relocation packets)
  • Official Newcomers Guide – annual piece inside the August issue of Tucson Lifestyle and printed as overruns for newcomers – information about the community, services you will need, etc)
  • Dining Guide – restaurant listing and information inside Tucson Lifestyle monthly; quarterly overruns are distributed throughout the city and at visitor information centers

 

Community / specific group publications

  • Arizona Jewish Post – Bi-monthly newspaper with information and events distributed to members of the Jewish community.
  • Arizona Daily Wildcat (University of Arizona student newspaper) – Publishes weekdays during Spring and Fall semesters
  • Southeast Side Connection – Monthly newsletter to Rita Ranch and Vail residents.
  • Tech Connect Magazine – Bi-monthly (every 2 months) Covers economic developments in the tech sector for businesses, government, and media.
  • Saddlebag Notes – Monthly TNI publication to Saddlebrooke residents
  • Tipster – Monthly newsletter to Sun City Vistoso residents
  • Robson Communities – Retirement community publications including – Saddlebrooke Progress and Quail Creek Crossing  (in Green Valley)
  • Aztec Press – Pima Community College every other week during Spring and Fall semesters
  • Tubac Villager – Monthly newsletter to for the residents and businesses in Tubac
  • R- Team  – Tucson Employee Association Magazine for employees at Raytheon
  • Rita Ranch Flyer – Monthly (only ads) flyer to residents of Rita Ranch
  • Vail Business Circular – Monthly (only ads) flyer to residents of Vail
  • Sahuarita Times –Monthly community publication for residents and businesses in Sahuarita and Green Valley
  • Desert Lightning – Weekly newspaper for Davis Monthan Air Force Base employees
  • El Imparcial – Daily Spanish publication in Spanish speaking areas of Tucson, Phoenix and Sonora, Mexico.

 

Wick Community Publications

  • Green Valley News and Sun – publishing Sundays and Wednesdays, this is the primary newspaper for the retirement community of Green Valley
  • Sahuarita Sun – publishes Wednesdays, this newspaper’s focus and distribution is Sahuarita
  • Santa Cruz Valley Sun – On Wednesdays, distributes in Tubac, Sahuarita, Green Valley, Sonoita and Patagonia
  • Sierra Vista Herald/Bisbee Daily Review – Daily newspaper for Sierra Vista; once per week a special focus on Bisbee is added
  • San Pedro Valley News – The Benson newspaper, distributes Wednesdays
  • Nogales International – A biweekly newspaper for Nogales that distributes on Tuesday and Friday
  • Weekly Bulletin – Distributes in Elgin, Sonoita and Patagonia on Wednesdays
  • Eastern Arizona Courier – Safford’s weekly newspaper
  • Copper Era – Clifton’s weekly newspaper
Outdoor
Outdoor options are varied and can be used creatively. Tucson lacks a major thoroughfare through the city; its streets are laid out in a grid with a multitude of intersections, which makes it an excellent market for reaching commuters with outdoor advertising. At the same time, structures located on developed surface streets mean pitfalls like building and tree blockages. The variety of sizes and costs of these structures give us a lot of creative freedom in designing a powerful campaign.  Having bought outdoor here for twenty years, we also know the structure availabilities and costs like the back of our hand.

Clear Channel Outdoor offers three outdoor products in Tucson:

image033  Bulletins

  • Typically 14’x48’
  • 285 total faces currently in the Tucson market
  • Can be either Rotary locations that move every 60 or 90 days to pre-selected target areas, or Permanent locations
  • The Perms may vary in size (whereas Rotaries are always 14’x48’)
  • The highest profile bulletin locations in Tucson that are 14’x48’ – are typically Rotaries.  That is because these are also the highest demand boards, and this allows more advertisers to enjoy the exposure as part of a high profile rotary campaign.
  • “Perming out” a bulletin location depends upon its traffic count, market demand, the cost of real estate for that structure to the outdoor company, past revenue of the structure, whether or not it is illuminated, and a number of other factors.
  • Posters and / or permanent bulletins are also available from Clear Channel Outdoor in a variety of outlying communities in Southern Arizona, including Benson, Bisbee, Casa Grande, Coolidge, Clifton, Douglas, Eloy, Florence, Nogales, Mammoth, Safford, Sierra Vista and Willcox.
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Eco Posters and Premier Panels

  • 10’5” x 22’8” and 12’3” x 24’6” respectively
  • Formerly known as “30 sheets,” these structures are often used for frequency, in key target areas following a business’ traffic patterns or to reach particular target areas.
  • Posters are less costly per location, and are typically purchased in four week increments.  When multiple four-week showings are in place, benefits include overrides, and reach to a variety of market areas.
  • Many posters exist throughout the Tucson market; when we design a poster campaign, the locations are selected based upon target areas throughout the city.  We also drive all locations because Tucson has grown up around the posters, and in this way we avoid the structures that have the most visual blockage.
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Junior Posters

  • 10’5” x 22’8” and 12’3” x 24’6” respectively
  • Formerly known as “30 sheets,” these structures are often used for frequency, in key target areas following a business’ traffic patterns or to reach particular target areas.
  • Posters are less costly per location, and are typically purchased in four week increments.  When multiple four-week showings are in place, benefits include overrides, and reach to a variety of market areas.
  • Many posters exist throughout the Tucson market; when we design a poster campaign, the locations are selected based upon target areas throughout the city.  We also drive all locations because Tucson has grown up around the posters, and in this way we avoid the structures that have the most visual blockage.

Transit Shelters and Bus Benches

AdVision Outdoor provides these products in Tucson.
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Transit Shelters

  • 4’x6’ backlit / solar illuminated panels
  • AdVision has 714 transit shelter faces to offer in the Tucson market
  • Locations are in place along bus routes, at bus stops
  • Because Clear Channel Outdoor was no longer allowed to add new structures after 1976, the transit faces provide reach into some “newer” areas where billboard structures simply do not exist.
  • Unlike some markets that use these structures as a way to reach foot traffic or bus riders, the benefits of these structures is primarily to reach commuters driving past the locations on Tucson’s busy streets.  This impacts the design approach, which must be bold with few words, large logo / company name, etc.
  • Locations are widespread and plentiful, so using the right structures to reach the right geographic and demographic targets is critical.
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Bus Benches

  • 2’x7’ full color vinyl-wrapped bench backs
  • AdVision has 531 benches in the Tucson market
  • Locations are along bus routes, but not necessarily near bus stops
  • Benches can sometimes be found on thoroughfares in front of businesses and / or on busy routes that are hard to reach with outdoor in any other way.
  • We’ve found benches to be advantageous as a frequency supplement to larger structure placements, as a directional, and for web URL campaigns.
Web
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Geographically targeting Tucson, we have successfully used geo-targeted Facebook campaigns as well as local websites to drive web traffic and sales.

Here is a usage ranking of local media websites (Scarborough Research Release 2, 2012), specific to the Tucson DMA:

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